Autumn 2018

Published 19 March 2018

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March Meanjin features the Nauru Diaries of former Royal Navy doctor Nick Martin. What he found in the Australian detention centre 'was way more traumatic than anything I'd seen in Afghanistan'. You'll also read Paul Daley on Indigenous history, statues and strange commemorations, Omar Sakr and Dennis Altman on the same sex marriage vote and Fiona Wright on Australia in three books. There's new fiction from Laura McPhee-Browne, Peter Polites, John Kinsella and Paul Dalla Rosa and a fine selection of new poetry from the likes of Stephen Edgar, Chris Wallace-Crabbe, Marjorie Main and Judith Beveridge.

 



Meanjin Papers

THE NAURU DIARIES 
Nick Martin


Up Front

NATIONAL ACCOUNTS 
Omar Sakr

THE ‘E’ WORD 
Melanie Cheng

THE SUBJECT OF THIS PROFILE IS EATING AN AVOCADO SALAD WITH A VINAIGRETTE DRESSING 
Evan Williams

THE BOOK HAS LEFT ME 
Phillipa McGuinness

THE ELEPHANT IN THE FILM 
Luke Slattery

ON REGRET 
Andrew Sant


Essays

AUSTRALIA IN THREE BOOKS 
Fiona Wright

THE MORAL MOMENT 
Patrick Stokes

THE COURSE OF TRUE LOVE . . . 
Dennis Altman

COMFORTABLE AND RELAXED WITH CONSERVATIVE POPULISM 
Andrew Bushnell

HEROES, MONUMENTS AND HISTORY 
Paul Daley

THE 2017 PARADOX PRIZE ADDRESS 
Julie Koh

SEEING LANDSCAPE 
Jennifer Mills

‘THE ROAD-MAKERS EAT MEAT THREE TIMES A DAY’ 
Grace Moore

‘UNFIT’ TO PLEAD 
Bernadette McSherry

INTRAMURAL 
Agatha Moar

HEARING BERTHA LAWSON 
Kerrie Davies

Memoir

A DIFFERENT TIME 
Shannon Burns

SINGING MY MOTHER HOME 
Melanie Pryor

MY JEWISH ATHEIST JOURNEY 
Antony Loewenstein

ONLY SO MUCH 
Eda Gunaydin

A DARKNESS, A SHADOW 
Helena Kadmos and Rachel Robertson

Fiction

STOMACH 
Laura McPhee-Browne

THE FINAL BOYS 
Peter Polites

PUSHING BACK
 John Kinsella

THE FAME 
Paul Dalla Rosa


Reviews

A LITTLE STINKER OF AN EXHIBITION 
Tim Harris

FOUR NEW COLLECTIONS AND A QUESTION 
MARK Martin Langford


Poetry

STAND-INS 
Philip Hammial

UNMINDED 
Stephen Edgar

MONEY 
Craig Sherborne

IN A JAIPUR GUEST HOUSE
 Carol Jenkins

THE CREEK 
Marjorie Main

INDUSTRY, MELBOURNE 
Belinda Rule

FLOATING WORLD 
S.K. Kelen

GOOD FORTUNE 
Michael Farrell

THE UNACCOMMODATED TONGUE 
Peter Rose

EXILE 
Belinda Rule

CREATURE 
Chris Wallace-Crabbe

SWEETNESS 
Judith Beveridge


Endnotes

THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME 
Andrew Ford and Anni Heino



Summer 2017

Published 1 December 2017

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In the December 2017 edition of Meanjin, futurist Mark Pesce argues that we are entering an age in which it will be increasingly hard to determine what, if anything, in our universe of information and sensation, is actually real; and that's not good news. For historian Rebe Taylor the discovery of a cache of Australian Aboriginal artefacts in an obscure British museum began an investigation that led back to the last years of Indigenous Tasmanians and the founding moments of the Victorian settlement; and from there to a consideration of the complex notion of 'humane colonisation'. Yassmin Abdel-Magied recounts her many, failed, attempts to leave Australia; Di Morrissey considers Australia in Three Books; Maxine Beneba Clarke is lost for words at writers' festival question time; Steven Carroll reports from his writing desk; Indigenous writer Claire G. Coleman looks at the arrival of Europeans and asks: 'just who are the nomads'…

 



Meanjin Papers

THE LAST DAYS OF REALITY Mark Pesce


Up Front

NATIONAL ACCOUNTS Maxine Beneba Clarke
REMEMBERING JOHNNO Maxine McKew
THESE ARE THE JOKES James Valentine
NOTES FOR A NOVEL-IN-PROGRESS Steven Carroll
PARSLEY TEA Lauren Butterworth
MAX & ROSA Alex Miller


Essays

AUSTRALIA IN THREE BOOKS Di Morrissey
A PARLIAMENT WITHOUT POLITICIANS? Katharine Murphy
THE WEDGE COLLECTION AND THE CONUNDRUM OF HUMANE COLONISATION Rebe Taylor
HIRAETH Sian Prior
WHEN WE ENCOUNTERED THE NOMADS Claire G. Coleman
MEDIA MEAN GIRLS? Lauren Rosewarne
INTO THE LONELINESS Eleanor Hogan
DARK STAR Barry Hill
NEW PLANS FOR DYING Zoë Krupka
SEEN BUT NOT HEARD Ruth Clare
THE LAST LITERARY EDITOR Susan Wyndham
RACE AND THE GOLDEN AGE Gabrielle Chan
IN THE PRESENCE OF LIGHT Rebecca Smith
SOME LINES ON LIFE DRAWING Kate Ryan
TWO FIRES Tony Birch
INSIDE THE DREAM: TWIN PEAKS, POLITICS, TRUST Dan Dixon
DIRTY LAUNDRY Joe Dolce

Memoir

LEAVING. FOR GOOD Yassmin Abdel-Magied
MAGIC Martin-McKenzie-Murray
VANISHING POINT Milissa Deitz
WALKING TO GERNIKA WITH PICASSO’S GUERNICA Mark E. Dean

 

Fiction

TAKEN HOME Alice Robinson
MOONLIGHT IN VERMONT SOUTH; OR Alan Wearne
M Gay Lynch
OF BURNT PHOTOS AND OLD FRIENDS Raaza Jamshed Butt
TOMMY NORLI John Morrisey
DIRT WORK Samuel Lewin


Poetry

ANTARCTIC PLATEAU Sophie Finlay
THE EMOTIONAL ASTRONOMER Bronwyn Lovell
AFTER THE STORM Ross Gillett
SYMPHONY OF SKIN Audrey Molloy
APOLLO POLINATION Rae White
BURIAL Michelle Cahill
I WAS THE LAST ONE LEFT Graeme Miles
SEPARATION CEREMONY Anna Jacobson
CITY LIGHTS 1952, CHARLES BLACKMAN Alicia Sometimes
BEAUTIFUL FIRETAIL Adam Stokell
THE WHOLE RUSSIA THING Liam Ferney
LIGHT CAME FROM THE OTHER SIDE Diana Bridge




Spring 2017

Published 18 September 2017

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In these strange times-the era of President Donald Trump and the constant contest between truth and political expedience-what is the responsibility of the intellectual, of the thinker? To sit on their hands? Or speak out and risk controversy and rebuke?
Renowned philosopher and public intellectual Raimond Gaita wrestles with this big issue in the spring edition of Meanjin and the result is a major essay, 'Truth In The Time Of Trump'.
In the same edition Katharine Murphy considers the trend toward public disengagement with politics while Guy Rundle fills notebook after notebook as France and Britain go to the polls.
Elsewhere, Anson Cameron celebrates the last days of Melbourne's somewhat notorious Gatwick Hotel; Scott Stephens charts the socially and morally destructive rise of inequality; Robyn Annear fears for a future with nothing but digital records; Eleanor Robertson ponders the many meanings of 'intersectionality'; Elle Hardy reports on urban America's war…

 



Meanjin Papers

THE INTELLIGENTSIA IN THE AGE OF TRUMP Raimond Gaita


Up Front

NATIONAL ACCOUNTS Matt Chun
BLOOD BROTHER Chris Womersley
THE GRAMMAR OF GERALD MURNANE John Stephenson
NO EASY FEAT Alana Hunt
GENOCIDE TOURIST Lucas Grainger-Brown
GROMMETS Jenny Sinclair


Essays

AUSTRALIA IN THREE BOOKS Kerryn Goldsworthy
THE POLITICS OF LISTENING Katharine Murphy
TWO TOWERS Scott Stephens
INTERSECTIONAL IDENTITY AND THE PATH TO PROGRESS Eleanor Robertson
SMOULDERING IN EUROPE’S PLEASURE GARDEN Guy Rundle
THE GATWICK HOTEL. VALE BEDLAM Anson Cameron
THE AMERICAN (DRUG) CENTURY Elle Hardy
THE PUNISHER’S NUMB RAGE Damon Young
MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE Erica Nathan
HENRY LAWSON LIGHTED LAMPS FOR US IN A VAST AND LONELY HABITAT… Miles Franklin, introduction by Ken Gelder and Rachael Weaver
WHITHER OZ TV AND FILM? Steve Dow
THE POLITICS OF ACHIEVEMENT Martin Langford
A NEW DARK AGE Robyn Annear
ON RE-READING BEAN’S OFFICIAL HISTORY Robin Gerster
THE SIGNWRITER AND THE CITY Nick Gadd
LUCY TRELOAR, SALT CREEK Peter Pierce
AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL’S INDIGENOUS HISTORY Roy Hay and Athas Zafiris

Memoir

THE FOX Mark Brandi
ANCESTOR WORSHIP Sophie Curzon-Siggers
ALL THAT’S FORBIDDEN Elisabeth Hanscombe
TO MISCARRY Miranda Tetlow
WALKING AND STOPPING AND LOOKING AND WALKING Alexander Bennetts

 

Fiction

NO TOES Michael Mohammed Ahmad
THE BLUE CAR Anthony Lynch
LANTERN Paul Shields
LEADEN HEART Liana Skrzypczak


Poetry

THOSE DAYS. Caitlin Maling
GIVING UP Nathan Curnow
A HISTORY OF BLUE Ella Jeffery
THE NIGHT JOURNEYS Andrew Sant
FERAL Caitlin Maling
WARHOL: NOTEBOOKS Eileen Chong
IT MAY ONLY TAKE A MINUTE Jill Jones
EVENING STILL LIFE WITH RED APPLES AND PROTEAS Nicola Scholes
SAILOR’S KNOT Omar Sakr
THE RECURRING PROBLEM OF A NEW DAY Amelia Theodorakis
THE HORIZON Angela Gardner
PARAKEETS OVER A LONDON GRAVEYARD Vanessa Proctor




 

Winter 2017

Published 19 June 2017

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A tinge of sadness in this June 2017 edition of Meanjin: it includes the last Commonplace column filed by John Clarke before his death in April. Published with the kind permission of his family it is a beautifully turned and now poignant piece.
Clarke's longtime home, the ABC, is the subject of the major essay in this Meanjin edition. Margaret Simons takes a long hard look at the broadcaster's past and present . and a future very much in contest. Katharine Murphy 'who'd be a politician'; Terry Barnes argues for the rise of the 'sensible centre'; and Shannon Burns writes in defence of the white working class. There's new fiction from A.S. Patric and Stephanie Bishop and as always a fine selection of new Australian poetry, including work from Judith BeveridgeAnthony LawrenceBen Walter and Owen Bullock.

 



Meanjin Papers

ARE YOU THINKING WHAT I’M THINKING? Margaret Simons



Memoir

ETHANOL, ESCHAR Charlotte Adderley
THE OTHER SIDE Adam Jeffrey

 

Fiction

AVULSION A.S. Patrić
VANTA BLACK Stephanie Bishop
FISH AND BREAD Jonathan Dunk
BEACON Rebecca Slater


Poetry

PATRICK WHITE’S BRIEFCASE Marcelle Freiman
QUASIMODO’S LAMENT Judith Beveridge
WHAT FOLLOWED Shastra Deo
WALKING WITH LUCIEN STRYK Anthony Lawrence
CLADDING SENTIMENT Ben Walter
EMBARRASSMENT Corey Wakeling
UNEMPTY PLACES Darby Hudson
CO Owen Bullock
I SAW THE DEVIL IN THE CANE FIELDS Shastra Deo
MY LOVE WAS CHOSEN FOR THE ARK Mitchell Welch
WATERLILY POND Judith Beveridge


Endnotes

COMMONPLACE John Clarke




 

Autumn 2017

Published 15 March 2017

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The writer's life ... it's not an easy one. In the autumn issue of Meanjin Australian literary giant Frank Moorhouse describes the often-difficult path followed by those hardy souls who take 'the writer's oath'. For the man behind Days of Wine and RageForty SeventeenDark Palace and the rest of the soon-to-be televised 'Edith Trilogy', it has been a lifelong journey studded with many books, prizes and much acclaim. Material rewards were never sought and perhaps that's for the best, for the writer's life is not a richly rewarded one. Moorhouse has some thoughts on how that might change.
Our moment in politics is nothing if not fascinating and regular Meanjin essayist Katharine Murphy wonders just where politics might take us next (and here's a clue: she's not really sure). Tasmanian writer Ben Walter walks through the singed and sodden Tarkine and finds an ancient eco-system in…

 



Meanjin Papers

IS WRITING A WAY OF LIFE? Frank Moorhouse



Memoir

WRITING A RIVER Linden Hyatt
OCCASIONALLY, A STRANGER TO WATCH THE STARS WITH Andrea Baldwin
THE OVERWHELMING DEVOTION AND PROTECTION OF A MAN WHO SHOOTS BIRDS, AND BUILDS THEM HOUSES Dave Drayton
LOSING TEETH Alexandra O’Sullivan

 

Fiction

AVULSION A.S. Patrić
VANTA BLACK Stephanie Bishop
FISH AND BREAD Jonathan Dunk
BEACON Rebecca Slater


Poetry

ANOTHER STEP AWAY Julie Chevalier
EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE Anthony Lynch
THE WESTERN DISTRICT William Fox
TINY GALAXIES Liam Ferney
‘YORICK’ John Kinsella
CHASING CELLO JOE Shey Marque
WILD HORSES Jodie Hollander
AUTUMN: AFTER RILKE Jonathan Dunk
GIFTS FOR CLOUD Kevin Gillam
THYLACINE Sascha Morrell


Endnotes

COMMONPLACE John Clarke
 

 

 

Summer 2016

Published 15 December 2016

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In the summer edition of Meanjin, Miles Franklin award winner Alexis Wright puts a challenging question: who should have the right to tell Aboriginal stories? Guy Rundle considers the Donald Trump victory and the changing state of US politics. Katharine Murphy reflects on the passing tides of parenthood, Tim Dunlop wonders what we'll all do in a world that has moved beyond work, Arnold Zable looks at the resilient beauty that can come from the depths of evil inhumanity. There's new memoir from Fiona Wright, fiction from John Kinsella and Beejay Silcox, and a fresh brace of new Australian poetry, including work by Anna Kerdijk Nicholson and Geoff Page. Plus, Commonplace: a new regular column from the legendary John Clarke.

 



Meanjin Papers

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU TELL SOMEBODY ELSE’S STORY? Alexis Wright


Up Front

NATIONAL ACCOUNTS Graham Freudenberg
ON HOUSE AND HOME Stephanie Convery
THE GREAT FORGETTING: TWENTY YEARS LATER Geoff Page
GET YOUR KICKS IN BATMAN 66 Damon Young
LETTERS OF A POET IN EXILE Peter Pierce
NAURU REVEALED Jenny Sinclair


Essays

AUSTRALIA IN THREE BOOKS Hannah Kent
YOU CAN FOOL SOME OF THE PEOPLE Guy Rundle
IS THE PERSONAL STILL POLITICAL? Dennis Altman
MARX OF QUEERNESS Matthew Sini
LANDSCAPES OF THE DEAD Ben Wilkie
SONIA LIZARON Arnold Zable
EDUCATION FOR HUMANS Peter Acton
HEROIC MEN AND HELPFUL WOMEN Alice Bishop
WORKEMON Tim Dunlop
BOUND BY BLOOD Connie Agius
WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW Emma Froggatt
SHAKESPEARE IN 2016 David McInnis
ZISSOU AND QUEENIE AND THE COINCIDENCE Carmel Bird

Memoir

TRANSPORT Mark Brandi
THE HAIR APPARENT Katharine Murphy
GOD AND I Andrew Ford
THE EVERYDAY INJURIES Fiona Wright
THE GIFTS OF JOHN FORBES Kath Kenny
FEAR OF FLYING Erin Stewart

 

Fiction

SISTERS John Kinsella
CRY WOLF Beejay Silcox
THREE DEATHS Zahid Gamieldien
TENDER PROXIMITY Philip Dean


Poetry

THE BAD IDEA Geoff Page
THE DOG, THE BLACKBIRD AND THE ANXIOUS MIND Rachel Mead
MARIENPLATZ—MUNICH Philip Neilsen
THE HIDDEN SIDE TO LOVE Claire Potter
SOARING CALIFORNIA S.K. Kelen
ORACULAR Aidan Coleman
REMEMBRANCER Anna Kerdijk Nicholson
THAT SPACE Belle Ling
QUIET AS AN ASHTRAY Luke Beesley
AT PLAY WITH GREY-CROWNED BABBLERS Brett Dionysius


Endnotes

COMMONPLACE John Clarke
 



 

Spring 2016

Published 15 September 2016

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Not the marrying kind? You're not alone. As Lauren Rosewarne reports, more the 40 percent of Australian women between 25 and 64 are single. By choice? By design? By circumstance? For better? For worse? Lauren takes a deeply personal look at a phenomenon that is quietly reshaping our world.
The facts are thinner on the ground elsewhere, especially in the world of politics and public affairs. Katharine Murphy wonders how journalism might deal with a political world in which facts and simple truth are out of favour, a theme picked up by the wonk's wonk, Greg Jericho.
That legend of Australian arts writing Patrick McCaughey casts a cold eye over the critical career of the late Robert Hughes and comes away just a little less than impressed, while Angela Smith wonders whether our major galleries are slowly but surely embracing the ethos of the circus.
Timmah Ball contemplates the rise…

 



Meanjin Papers

CHOOSE YOUR OWN (MISS)ADVENTURE Lauren Rosewarne


Up Front

NATIONAL ACCOUNTS Toby Ralph
IT HAD BECOME MY INSTINCT TO LAUGH Gabrielle Jackson
BUT ENOUGH ABOUT ME Richard Chirgwin
THE GUIDEBOOK Alice Melike Ülgezer
VIEW FROM A TREEHOUSE Jane Gilmore
RECOGNITION FROM THE RIGHT Dominic Kelly


Essays

AUSTRALIA IN THREE BOOKS Katherine Brabon
THE RANCOR OF ROBERT HUGHES Patrick McCaughey
TRUTH AND THE NEW POLITICS Katharine Murphy
ART NOW Angela Smith
DOWN ON THE DATA Greg Jericho
WHO’S AFRAID OF THE BLACK MIDDLE CLASS? Timmah Ball
THE LABOUR MOVEMENT: MY PART IN ITS DOWNFALL Tim Lyons
BURGERS AND BIRTHRIGHTS Eleanor Gordon-Smith
ARTS FUNDING: THE RANDOM ALTERNATIVE Martin Langford
BEING BOB ELLIS Jan McGuinness

Memoir

NOW NO-ONE HERE IS ALONE Melissa Howard
A CAPACITY TO LIE Luke Stegemann

 

Fiction

JACKALOPE Emma Schwarcz
GIRLS CALLING GIRLS Laura Stortenbeker
THE LAST THING SHE EXPECTED Erin Ritchie
MISTER CARDIGAN Colin Varney
FROM THEIR BRILLIANT CAREERS Ryan O’Neill


Poetry

YEAR OF THE WASP Joel Deane
BACCHUS MARSH ROAD Brendan Ryan
PAUL KLEE’S FISH MAGIC Jan Dean
TINY ISLAND Jill Jones
BRANCH Stuart Cooke
WINDBORNE AVENUE Louis Klee
PETRICHOR Broede Carmody
OF BOOKS AND SILENCE Peter Boyle
INVISIBLE CITIES David McCooey
FRESH HEAVEN Michael Farrell
 




 

Winter 2016

Published 15 June 2016

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The Meanjin winter issue takes on the culture wars. It's an essential primer in this election season written by Melbourne academic Mark Davis, the man who brought you Gangland, the book that revealed the baby boomer cultural monopoly. Now Davis turns his attention to the shady world of cultural politics, a world dominated by race, climate, and irrational fear. Why does our public debate keep retreating to the familiar tropes of the culture wars, and why does this conversation feature so many recurring themes and characters?
Elsewhere in the issue, Clive James muses on writing, death and epitaphs ahead of the publication of his Collected Poems. Jenny Hocking traces the profound links between Australian Rules football and the Indigenous Australian game of Marngrook, while Robyn Annear marvels at her mother's hair. There's a critical essay on a favourite piece of fiction from Anna Funder, and a serious piece of research…

 



Meanjin Papers

AT WAR WITH OURSELVES Mark Davis



Memoir

OUR LUCKY COUNTRY Melanie Cheng
PERMANENT WAVE: MY MOTHER’S HAIR Robyn Annear

 

Fiction

PORCH LIGHT Alice Bishop
A REVIEW OF OVER THERE BY STANISLAUS NGUYEN Michael McGirr
THE VOICE Eva Bujalka
DAYS OF YIELDING Ben Walter
FROM THEIR BRILLIANT CAREERS Ryan O’Neill


Poetry

EBON CANS Stuart Barnes
NOT LONG NOW David Mortimer
AT THE WESTERN STATION Andrew Stuckgold
COLLECTING BOTTLES Glenn McPherson
FAITH, OR THE MEMORY OF RAIN Anne Elvey
HOUSE GUEST Meredith Pitt
FLIGHT James Gering
YOU’VE WALKED OUT ON THE TONGUE OF A VALLEY’S ENORMOUS MOUTH Stuart Cooke
BRUISE Charles Freyberg
OPERATIONAL MATTERS Andrew Stuckgold
RUSA Eileen Chong
THREAD Todd Turner
FROM THE TU FU VARIATIONS NORTH Greg McLaren
SAGE-BRUSH SENTINELS Paul Scully
SWEAT Geoff Page
PRESSED METAL David Mortimer
LISTENING TO CALLAS SING BELLINI AT LA SCALA, 1952 Charles Freyberg
KNOWLEDGE David Mortimer
THE RENOVATION Geoff Page
UNSETTLED IN CHELTENHAM: OCTOBER 16TH David Mortimer
GREAT GULL Sarah Holland-Batt
ROSEATE SPOONBILL Sarah Holland-Batt
 

Autumn 2016

Published 15 March 2016

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In the Autumn issue of Meanjin Australian literary legend Gerald Murnane explains what a long and complex sentence can do for meaning. We explore the cracks between the gender binary, wonder what it is that makes regional Australia tick, and look again at the art of Tom Roberts. There's new fiction from Michael Wilding and Heather Rose, poetry from Peter Minter and Julie Chevalier, and Mile Franklin winner Sofie Laguna lists her contenders for Australia in Three Books. 



Meanjin Papers

IN PRAISE OF THE LONG SENTENCE Gerald Murnane


Up Front

NATIONAL ACCOUNTS Amy McQuire
I WANTED TO DIE. I WANTED TO LIVE Gina Rushton
THE ECONOMY OF BEST PERCEPTIONS Stephen Koukoulas
APARTMENT LIVING Asher Wolf
LISTENING Zoe Krupka
THE LUMPEN CRITIC Shannon Burns


Essays

AUSTRALIA IN THREE BOOKS Sofie Laguna
DRIVING MR MENZIES Paul Daley
CONSERVATIVE FUTURES Gray Connolly
GETTING SQUARE IN A JERKING CIRCLE Luke Carman
I, CITIZEN Fatima Measham
GET MAD AND GET EVEN Eleanor Roberston
REAL MEN DO HIT WOMEN Michael Salter
ROADS TO COEN Timothy Neale
POLITICS THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS The Piping Shrike
ECHOES OF GONDWANA Stuart Cooke
ARE WE THERE YET? Kevin Brophy
FORGET HEIDELBERG? Gary Werskey
CONTEMPORARY MASTERS Martin Langford
FROM THEIR BRILLIANT CAREERS: BARRY BURBAGE Ryan O’Neill

Memoir

ANOTHER COUNTRY Gabrielle Chan
IN PRAISE OF BEING KNOWN Marcia Jacobs
SUNDAY BLDY SUNDAY Elizabeth Smyth
THE TEA ROOM K.W. George

 

Fiction

BOOK FUTURES Michael Wilding
THE FIVE SORROWFUL MYSTERIES Philomena van Rijswijk
MR HEMINGWAY’S FISH Heather Rose

 




 

Summer 2015

Published 1 December 2015

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The summer 2015 issue of Meanjin has a wonderful essay from author and academic Margaret Simons based on an extraordinary novella-length love letter from Germaine Greer to Martin Amis. Join Greer as she travels the United States in the late seventies, flushed with the success of The Female Eunuch, seeking comfort in the arms of her American lover, seeking out pharmaceuticals with Frank Zappa, poring over Solzhenitsyn and pining for home as she scrawls page after page addressed to Amis. Discover the architect who actually made Jorn Utzon's Sydney opera house work after Utzon fled the project leaving an empty and dysfunctional shell. Wonder what the Turkish secret police have made of Shane Maloney's latest unfinished novel. Read new fiction from John Kinsella, Nike Sulway and Omar Musa and fresh poetry from Erin Shiel, David Wood and more. Much more. 



Meanjin Papers

‘The Long Letter To A Short Love, Or …’: by Margaret Simons


Up Front

National accounts, December Quarter: by Robyn Williams
Ondaatjie in Somerset: by Geoff Lemon
Hiroshima 70: by Kumi Taguchi
Check your Entitlement: by Damon Young
White’s Brown Woman: by Denise Varney
Australia in Three Books: by Peter Pierce


Essays

The Politics We Deserve: by Katharine Murphy
Sydney Takes Shape: by Madeline Watts
The Poisoned Chalice: by Anne Watson
Bomb Sights In Japan: by Robin Gerster
Mad Monks and the Order of the Tin Ear: by Louise D’Arcens and Clare Monagle
Sinking in the Sublime: by Stephen Valambras Graham
Muscling Up to the World: by Andrew Carr
Capitalism and the Uselessness of the Poem: by Martin Langford
From Their Brilliant Careers, Marcus Steele: by Ryan O’Neill

Memoir

Written In My Body: by Na’ama Carlin
That’s Nobody’s Business But The Turks’: by Shane Maloney
A Word In Your Ear: by Joel Deane

 

Fiction

See That Gully. The Ghost I have Become In A World Of Asbestos: by John Kinsella
Missing: by Omar Musa
Shit-Lips, Cat-Knackers and the Dog-Fondler: by Warwick Newnham
Saltpan: by Nike Sulway
 

Poetry

The International Prototype: by Benjamin Dodds
Casuarinia cunninghamiana–River She-Oak: by Russell Erwin
Amaranthine: by Louise Carter
Searching For A Cigarette In The Blackout After A Flood: by Brian Purcell
Bach: by David Wood
The Question: by Nicolette Stasko
in their apartment: by Daniel John Pilkington
Jealousy?: by Trevor Bailey
Things On An Iron Tray On The Floor: by Trevor Bailey
On The Death Of The Past: by Christopher Palmer
Elegy Written In A Dead Metropolitan Library: by Corey Wakeling
Syaw: by Erin Shiel
Ode On An Imprecise Subject: by Dugald Williamson
Loss: by Michelle Cahill
apologia to the converted: by Judy Durrant

 




 

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